Summer by the Sea, 1903 (Sheringham),

Summer by the Sea, 1903 (Sheringham).

Photos from the Pete Grafton Collection.

Sheringham beach, 1903.  From a family album of photos from a summer stay in Sheringham, Norfolk, 1903.

The photos were kept in a Kodak photo album.

“Sheringham” inscription, inside cover page of the Kodak photo album.

_____________________________

“A Pretty Corner, Sheringham”.  Crop from a J.Salmon postcard, pre-1914, but published after the coming of the railway to Sheringham.

The railway came to Sheringham on the Norfolk coast in 1887.  This was quite late for coastal villages and small towns that were to become seaside holiday destinations. For instance, the railway came to Weston-super-Mare in 1841, Southport in 1848, Girvan in 1860 and Newquay in 1876.

Train in a Sheringham garden, 1903.  Photo from the Kodak family album.

Although two brick works are shown in the Sheringham area on a 1906 Ordnance Survey map it’s likely the railway brought the materials, and probably the men that built The Grand Hotel.    It opened  in 1898.

The Grand Hotel, Sheringham.   It had a ballroom, a billiards room, and a bowling green. 

Sheringham was typical of many British seaside resorts that developed quickly with the coming of a railway.  Where once there had been just fields and cottages, and “pretty corners”, or no corners at all seaside resorts sprang up.   There was a public – a population – ready and eager to soak up the sea, the sun (when it appeared) and the fun.

Crowds on North Pier, Blackpool, Lancashire, Easter, 1914.

Sheringham was a three and a quarter hour train journey from London Liverpool Street station, changing at Norwich.

London Liverpool Street station, morning rush-hour, pre-1914.

Because Sheringham was not close to industrial cities and towns the seaside holiday-makers were mostly middle class, and entrepeneurs were quick to build detached house with large gardens for summer lettings, or ownership.

A Sheringham house, with Mother, child and on the left, nanny/domestic servant.  Circa 1903.  From the Kodak family album.

London & North Eastern Railways map of train lines in the Norfolk and adjacent area, 1930.  Sheringham is at the top, near Cromer.

The original 1887 Midland & Great Northern Joint Railway line went from Norwich to Sheringham via Melton Constable and then on to Cromer Beach, where it terminated.  This crop is from how the local railway lines had developed by 1930, by which time they were owned by LNER.  Source LNER route map.

Page from the Kodak Sheringham photo album, 1903.

The Kodak London address on the inside cover of the Kodak photo album –  “43, Clerkenwell Road” – dates the album to 1903. The year before and the years after Kodak’s London address was different.  The album may have been old stock when bought by the wife or husband (featured in the photos that follow) but with the immense popularity of photography ushered in by roll film Kodak cameras, and the demand for photo albums to put them in, it is reasonable to assume that the photos that follow were taken in the summer of 1903 0r the summer of 1904.

Kodak camera promotion advertisement.  The Kodak woman with the distinct striped dress was introduced in their advertising in 1910.

Sheringham Beach, 1903.

The child with his back to us is one of the three children that the mother, and the father, (when he was down at the weekends) took photos of.  We know nothing about the family, beyond what we can speculate from the contents in the photos that follow.  They were probably renting the house (rather than owning it) for the summer;  they had a nanny/domestic servant and Dad, when we see him, seems to be a dapper middle class gent, and definitely not “trade”.  Most of those on the beach and elsewhere that we see are also middle class.  There is one exception, where the gent is possibly “trade”, and possibly from nearby Norwich.  It is assumed the other holidaymakers were mostly from London and the Home Counties.  The Kodak photo album was bought by Pete Grafton in 2008 in a second-hand bookshop.

____________________________

By the Sea

“Sheringham is So….” 1903. 

Five years later: John Hassal’s artwork for the first “Skegness is So Bracing” poster, 1908.

Young boy – the young son of the family – on the beach, Sheringham, 1903.

Nanny/domestic servant, young son* sitting on the beach, his sister standing facing us and found on the beach beach-mate. The onlooking dog is not part of the family.

* It is strongly believed that despite the hat, and skirted garments the young child sitting on the beach is a boy, the son of the family.   There was a fashion of dressing small boys in dresses and other skirted garments from the late nineteenth century well into the Edwardian period.  This fashion did not survive the First World War. This fashion was separate from the velvet jackets and long hair style inspired by the novel Little Lord Fauntleroy.  The following photo, believed to have been taken in the USA in the late nineteenth century is an example of boys wearing dresses.

Studio photo of three boys in dresses. Late nineteenth century, believed to be USA. Photo source House of Mirth.

Boy in dress with dog, late nineteenth century. Unknown photo source.

Sister and her brother, Sheringham, 1903.

Older sister, her brother, and the younger sister with her back to us holding a dog.  In the sea,  Sheringham, 1903.

We will see a photo of the dog – a puppy, again, in the garden of the house it is presumed the family are renting for the summer.

Believed to be the Nanny/domestic servant, walking down to the sea with the young brother.  Photo believed to have been taken by Mum. Dad seemed to come down to Sheringham at the weekends.  Sheringham, 1903.

Believed to be Mum, in her swimsuit. Note the swimsuit detail on her shoulders, absent in the Nanny’s swimsuit.  Sheringham, 1903.

Mum with her son and daughter. Sheringham, 1903.

The beach at Sheringham had a mixture of stretches of sand, stretches of large pebbles, and a mixture of both.  Sheringham, 1903.

Brother and sister, with beach spades, pebble beach, cool summer day.  Sheringham, 1903.

Sandy beach with brother and his sisters.  Note the bather. Coolish day, Sheringham, 1903.

Dapper Dad, on the beach. It is believed he came down to Sheringham at weekends. 1903.

Dad with his daughters and son. Sheringham beach, 1903.

Dad with his younger daughter, outside their changing hut. Overcast cool day. The child and woman to their right have use of the adjoining beach hut.

Dad outside changing hut with his eldest daughter. The changing hut looks cheaply built. Would it survive a storm? The initials probably refer to the hirer of these huts.  Update:  The hut initials are those of local fisherman and Sheringham lifeboat crew member Jimmy Dumble who had a concession for beach huts on this section of the beach – West Beach.  My thanks to Tim Groves, chair of the Sheringham Museum Trust for this information. (1)

Nanny with the younger daughter and son. Note the beach changing huts in the background. Sheringham, 1903.

Nanny with the children in the water. Sheringham, 1903.

Younger daughter on a nice warm sea-side day, with rowing boat.  Note the finger print caused when the film was developed.   Sheringham, 1903.

Nanny with the little boy. Her facial dark skin colour is probably caused by the limitations of the then widely used Ortho film.  It was not good at capturing the different light tones and certain colours.  In some photos of the children their faces are accurately captured whilst their hands in the shadows can be very dark. The limitations of ortho film can be seen particularly in old photos of summer gardens where green vegetable leaves and orange flowers can be rendered almost black.

A sunnier beach day, Nanny with the little boy.

Snapshot taken by either Mum or Dad.  Note the Grand Hotel up on the left. The children, dressed very differently, are not the family children.

“The Promenade, Sheringham.”  A Jarrold’s Series postcard. No date.

Homeward bound.  The Nanny with the little boy in his perambulator, his younger sister on the grass bank. 

_____________________

House & Garden

The holiday home and garden. Mum, son and on the left, the nanny.  Sheringham, 1903.

The brick built house with cement rendering would have been built following the arrival of the railway in 1887.  There’s about ten years of climbing ivy growth on the house, which would roughly date it to 1893.  It’s a hot day with integral sun blinds out, and upstairs windows open.  There’s a curious ad-hoc net curtain, and curtain pieces set-up in the windows, as if they have been rigged up by the family, who it is assumed are renting for the summer. As there is a roll blind drawn three-quarters of the way down in the large upstairs window it is assumed the ad-hoc curtaining is to give some privacy, rather than pull curtains to, or blinds right down on hot sunny days.

The tree on the right is struggling.

There’s a soil pipe, seen rising above the guttering, next to a small open window, which will be the toilet.  Whether it fed into a septic tank or whether mains sewage had been installed for the new houses is not known.  House lighting would probably have been by gas, though many older houses and buildings in the town would still be lit by paraffin lamps.  The kitchen could possible have a gas oven, a relatively new innovation in those days. The town’s gas works (it’s assumed Sheringham had a gas works) would run on coal, originally brought to the town by coastal shipping, and then carted on by horses. With the coming of the railway, coal would be brought by train.  Local stations up and down the land had a siding or sidings and a coal yard, right up to the 1960s.  Even after many lines were axed, the coal yard would survive near the derelict country station.  Going by the double chimneys, there at least 6 fireplaces in the house, though one could be for a coal burning kitchen range.

In 1903 families would make their own amusement: cards, games, reading, singing and music, if there was a piano.  The “Talking Machine” –  the gramophone, was starting to become popular, but was not yet that widespread.  Few houses in 1903 had telephones, including even those of upper class folk, but there were three Royal Mail letter and postcard deliveries a day, and a telegram could be sent, say from London, and delivered to the house on the same day.

Mum, Son and daughters on the very large lawn of the house. Glimpse of another house built around the same time.  Photo most likely taken by Dad or the eldest daughter.  Sheringham, 1903.

Crop of the above photograph.  Mum, son and daughter in the garden.  Note the nanny/domestic servant in the background. It looks as if she is weeding a flower border. Sheringham, 1903.

This was a happy family, with a great sense of fun….

Oop-la!

The son on his toy train. Note the shadow of Dad’s peaked cap, as he takes the photo.

Nanny/domestic servant/wicket-keeper. Note the “at home” pinafore and the white cuffs she wears over her by-the-sea “Nanny” dress.  Nice swinging “hit it for 6” action from the batswoman.

“Out!”

Lovely to see the hint of a smile on the Nanny. She looks like a well liked/loved Nanny. Note her cap: this photo is taken on a different occasion from the cricket match.

The new puppy?

Crop from above photo.  Puppy dog, Sheringham, 1903.  Note the girls’ sandals.  We saw the puppy carried by the younger daughter in the sea in an earlier photo.

Son’s wardrobe adjustment by Mum…

… Adjusted.

It’s imagined that the house and the surrounding houses with these large gardens have been jostled in by shoe-horned homes since the 1970s where the gardens once were.  In fact, it’s possible some of these pre-1914  houses were demolished to maximise the amount of new homes that could be built on the site.

____________________________

Fishermen, Boats & Fishing

The coming of the railway to Sheringham in 1887 not only brought city and suburban middle class families to what had been a by-the-sea fishing hamlet, it also benefited the local fishermen.   Their catch of fresh crabs, lobsters and whelks, and cod were sent on the up train to the Billingsgate fish market in London.  The Wikipedia entry on Sheringham estimates that because of the coming of the railway the number of Sheringham fishing boats harvesting the sea reached a peak of 200.

Fisherman repairing lobster pot with promenading ladies in the background. Note what looks like a fairly new concrete slip, possibly for the lifeboat.  Photo by either Dad or Mum.  Update:  The building is the Henry Ramey Lifeboat House. My thanks to Brian Farrow of Sheringham RNLI for this information. (2)  Sheringham 1903.

Fishermen by their boats and view towards the lifeboat station.  This photo is believed to have been taken at the same time as the one above.  (Note the fisherman repairing his pot in the background, behind the boats.)   Sheringham, 1903.

The Sheringham Lifeboat. The son and his younger sister in the mid-ground. Update:  The lifeboat is most likely the William Bennett, in service 1886 – 1904.  It has been described as a very difficult boat to launch. For this information and identification of the Lifeboat House (see the two photos above) my thanks to Brian Farrow of the Sheringham RNLI  (2)  Sheringham 1903.

The Sheringham lifeboat William Bennet on Beach Road, and fishermen, with son and sister looking at the lifeboat. My thanks to Brian Farrow, Sheringham RNLI for this information. (2)    Sheringham, 1903.

Sheringham Lifeboat William Bennett, with the younger sister looking at a group of fisherman. By her dress we can tell that this photograph was taken on a warmer day than the previous photo. The girl in the foreground is probably a local girl. Note her different type of clothes  Also note the gas light. Lifeboat information from Brian Farrow, Sheringham RNLI.  (2)   Sheringham, 1903.

Sheringham summer visitors looking down at a probable hauling of nets.  Note  on the foreground right what seems to be the head and shoulders of Dad as he takes the photograph, a shadow of a lamp standard and then the long shadow of a boy. Mid summer’s evening,  Sheringham, 1903.

Crop of the above photo showing the onlookers and a bath chair. On the left, a fingerprint smudge from photo developing.

2nd crop of the main photo. Note the “For Sale” sign on the building on the right, and dogs.

Harvesting the sea at Sheringham. Visitors and fisherfolk on the beach. Photo taken on a different, overcast day to the photo above.  Note the wall (blurred, foreground) as in above photo. Sheringham,1903.

Fisherwomen on the beach, and typical type of fishing boat used at Sheringham.  1903.

Two fishing boats beached, and changing tents for the tourists. A woman reads a book and visitors on the beach.   A warm calm day.  Sheringham 1903.

______________________________

After the Storm

Photos after a storm, or a high tide with a strong on-shore wind.

Beach storm damage, Sheringham, summer, 1903.

_______________________________

Here and There

The elder daughter side-saddle on a donkey. The boy will be earning some useful money. Note the ragged ends to his breeches. The school leaving age was 13 in 1903.  In agricultural areas many parents took their children temporary out of school for seasonal work, such as pea or fruit picking.  There were Truancy Officers, but the extra money coming into the household was an opportunity not to be missed, and would be looked forward to each year.   The boy in the photograph may well have left school in the summer of 1903.  He looks as if he could be 13.  

Nanny and the son, with arm of Mum, near the golf links above the town. Photo believed to have been taken by Dad.

A wonderful photo of the son at the same location. The photo is unusual, like the one above, because of the sky and white cloud detail, lacking in all the other photos in this collection.  This suggests that Dad has put a yellow filter over the lens, that brings out such detail.

A “candid” photo near the golf links above the town, with the Grand Hotel in the background. It’s a lovely study, and Dad, who probably took it, might have been “tickled pink” by the subject matter. It looks as if the gent is in “trade”. 

Another “candid photo”, this time of canoodling couples on the beach at Yarmouth, 1892.  Yarmouth is further down the coast from Sheringham. This type of “behaviour” would not be permissible for the middle class seaside visitor, and would rarely be seen, if at all, in 1903 Sheringham.  Photo: Paul Martin. (1)

The son in his summer finery in a lane. Going by the details, it’s reasonably sure that the house in the background is the same house that he and his sisters, his  Mum and Dad nanny/domestic and the puppy are staying in.  The two white painted posts will be an entrance into the garden, near where the photo was taken of the manicured gravel path, with Mum and his two sisters and the puppy dog on the lawn.  Houses seen beyond the garden in some of the garden photos will be over to the right (unseen). 

The two sisters gingerly crossing a trickle of a stream. In the background it looks as if the Fair has come to Sheringham.  The tents and horse-drawn vehicles are in too good a condition for it to be a gypsy camp.

Crop from the above photograph.

Cattle and ducks, or geese, in a field, from the same outing, going by the clothes. The function of the lone pole is a mystery. Sheringham, 1903.

Sunny but windy.

“And dolly came too”. Family walk in the nearby countryside, with nanny pushing the perambulator. Dolly has her own  perambulator. This dolly perambulator is seen in one of the photos taken in the garden. Dad would have taken this photo.

________________________________

There is still a train service to Sheringham from London via Norwich. The Sheringham Grand Hotel was demolished in 1974.  The Sheringham fishing fleet and the men have almost disappeared.  The Wikipedia entry for Sheringham says that there are now just eight boats operated single-handedly.

And the family in the photo above and the Nanny, and Dad?  Nothing, as yet, is known about them.  There were two World Wars to come.  Was Dad conscripted into the First World War?  The son would have been about 39 when the Second World War began. Did the nanny work in ammunitions in the First World War and earn a lot more money than being a nanny/domestic?  And did Mum volunteer for the Voluntary Aid Detachments – the VADs?

After the First World War  the fashion for dressing young middle class boys in dresses and skirted garments ceased, whilst young women bobbed their hair audaciously – boyishly -short and their chest was minimised.

If Nanny, or the daughters or the son had had children their surviving grandchildren would now be in the 70s to mid 90s age range, and there would be great-grandchildren and great-great-grandchildren texting, Messaging each other,  ordering their grocery and clothes online and phoning for Indian curries and Italian pizzas to be delivered to their door.  They’re mostly drinking French, Californian and Australian wines along with Czech pilsner.  They’re driving German, French, Japanese and South Korean cars, and they Skype and Facetime each other –  relatives and friends in Australia, or those taking a holiday on the hot seaside beaches of Majorca and Miami.

But, despite all the changes, dollies still go on outings,  and puppy-dogs still bring warmth and delight to households.

_________________________________

Footnote

(1)  sheringhammuseum.co.uk

(2) sheringhamlifeboat.co.uk

(3) See Victorian Candid Camera: Paul Martin 1864 – 1944, edited by Bill Jay, David & Charles, 1973.

Further Reading

The Snapshot Photograph: the rise of popular photography 1888 – 1939, Brian Coe and Paul Gates,  Ash & Grant, 1977.

The Seaside by Sarah Howell, Studio Vista, 1974.

______________________________

If you spot mistakes of fact or can add further information to these photos of Sheringham, do please get in touch using the Leave a Reply box below. Thank-you.

_____________________________

With the exception of Pin Interest, for use of these photos from the Sheringham 1903 Family Photo Album contact Pete Grafton in the Contact Box at the foot of this Post.

________________________________________

Don’t Miss a Photo Post

Click on the FOLLOW button at the top right.

__________________________________

Coming in September 2018

B U C H E N W A L D

June 2008

photos by Pete Grafton

Buchenwald, former railway track into Buchenwald Concentration Camp, built by prisoners.  Photo Pete Grafton.

Buchenwald, red floor with drain.  Photo Pete Grafton.

Buchenwald, coat hangers, cafeteria.  Photo Pete Grafton.

_______________________________

Advertisements
Posted in England | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Trees/Tree

Trees/Tree

photos by Pete Grafton

________________________

Central Paris, France, 2008.

Albi, France, 2001.

Sannox beach, Isle of Arran, Scotland, 2004.

Beach near Formby, England, 2007.

Biggar, Scotland, 2011.

Climpy, near Forth, Scotland, 2003

Clyde valley, Scotland, 2003.

Clyde valley blossom, Scotland, 1999.

Old plum orchard, Clyde valley, Scotland, 1999.

Currie, Edinburgh, Scotland, 2003.

Dawlish, Devon, England, 2014.

Frosted leaves, Climpy, near Forth, Scotland, 2003.

Frosted trees, near New Lanark, Scotland, 2001.

Hamburg Altona, 2000.

Inverewe, Wester Ross, Scotland, 2007.

Near Bellagio, Italy, 2002.

Lausanne, Switzerland, 2010.

Mouse Water, Lanark, Scotland, 2002.

Gorge, Mouse Water, Lanark, Scotland, 2002.

Near Rockcliffe, Scotland, 2002.

Near Beattock Summit, Scotland, 2004.

Near Biggar, Scotland, 2010.

Park, central Gothenburg, Sweden, 2003.

Pisa airport, Italy, 2005.

Quai de Bourbon, Paris, France, 2010.

Rowan, near Crawfordjohn, Scotland, 2005.

Sannox Bay, Isle of Arran, Scotland, 2006.

Sannox Golf Course, Isle of Arran, Scotland, 2004.

Silver birch, Carnwath, Scotland, 2009.

Hamburg suburb, Germany,  2000.

“Elephant trunk”, near Morpeth, England, 2005.

Hamburg Altona, Germany, 2005.

Selkirk, Scotland, 2010.

Belsay Gardens, near Morpeth, England, 2005.

Lochranza, Isle of Arran, Scotland, 2006.

North Medwin by Waulkmill, Scotland, 2001.

Tree near the former bus station, Bath, England, 2002.

Tree bark near the Elbe, Hamburg, Germany, 2002.

Crawford Common, Scotland, Summer, 2002.

Crawford Common, Scotland, winter 2002.

Village tree, Midi region, France, 2001.

Midi region, France, 2001.

Vallorbe, Switzerland, 2010.

Clyde Valley, 2000.

________________________________________

 

Posted in England, France, Germany, Paris, Scotland, Sweden, Switzerland | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Dawlish: Is a Bird, Is it a Plane?

Dawlish: Is it a Bird, Is it a Plane?

A Happening. 2015.

Photos by Pete Grafton

________________________________

This is how it begins….

 

Is it a Bird, Is it a Plane?   –  Planes.

_____________________________________

Coming next, late May, 2018

Trees/Tree

Photos by Pete Grafton

Paris park, May 2010.

Village in the Tarn region, France, 2001.

______________________

Posted in England | Tagged , , , | Leave a comment

US Orthopaedic Doc in Eastern Bloc 1958 – 1960. Part 3: Hungary

US Doc in Eastern Bloc 1958 – 1960

__________________________________

Photos from the petegrafton collection

Part 3: Hungary summer 1959 & Spring 1960.

The Background

Us Doc, an orthopaedic specialist, in Prague, summer 1959. His name is believed to be Dr A Seyfried.

We have, at the moment, no idea how it was that the American Doc, believed to be Dr A Seyfried, an orthopaedic specialist, was visiting Communist controlled countries in the Eastern Bloc. (My very grateful thanks to Liz Willis, former librarian with the Medical Research Council, London, for searching and locating in Pubmed papers written by a Dr A Seyfried. By their speciality – mostly in arthritic and rheumatoid conditions, and period of publication – 1953 – 1999,  and that these papers were mostly published in Polish specialist publications, and one published in a Czech  publication, we can be reasonably sure this is the one and same person. The full Pubmed list is at the foot of this Post.)

The Cold War was at its height – the Hungarian Uprising had been put down by Soviet tanks and military in October 1956 –  just three years before these photos were taken in Hungary.

It may be that Dr.Seyfried, and a colleague were working for, or attached to the World Health Organisation in Geneva.  In transparencies from Czechoslovakia a Mercedes with Swiss plates is shown.

The photos – Kodachrome transparencies – were mostly taken by a colleague – possibly also a visiting US doctor – of the “US Doc”.  They were bought on ebay in 2008.  The seller had additional sets of photos taken  – by the same source –  of visits to Poland and Czechoslovakia in 1958 and 1959.

Kodachrome transparency and mount, processed September 1958.

Only a  very few of the transparency mounts had an identifying name – place, or person. The majority didn’t.  The ebay seller batched the sales under country, and year.  The year can be identified by the Kodak lab  date stamp on the transparency mounts.

The transparencies shown here are selected first by the orthopaedic interest, and then by local photos, outings and so on.  They are a rare colour chronicle of aspects of everyday life, and civic life,  in countries that were to live under Communist/military control  in Eastern Europe for a further 32 years from when they were taken. And, of course, they show orthopaedic practices and care of children and adults at that time.

Please use the Leave a Reply facility to get in touch if you can identify towns, places, people, or anything you spot and can clarify.  It would be very much appreciated.

__________________________________

Hungary

Orthopaedic  Practice

Dr Seyfried on the steps of one of the entrances to the Budapest Medical University. He is standing in front of the Surgery Clinic sign. Dr. Pal Rubanyi , presumed to be the department Director, is listed as University Teacher – see detail below.  Budapest, early Spring 1960.

Dr Seyfried standing next to Budapest Medical University Surgical Clinic sign, early Spring, 1960.  Crop of above photograph.

US or Hungarian medical colleague standing by the Mercedes the US Doc seems to be using on this early Spring 1960 trip to Hungary and Budapest. Possibly the entrance – or one of the entrances – to the Medical University is just up the street.

Nurse applying plaster to a patient’s wrist. Unknown clinic, but assumed to be in Budapest.  Early Spring, 1960.

Assumed to be orthopaedic patients doing exercises using dumb bells. Believed to be a Budapest clinic, early Spring, 1960.

Assumed to be orthopaedic patients on mats in exercise area. Unknown clinic, probably in Budapest. Variation of above photo.  Early Spring, 1960.

The sign outside the National Institute of Motor Therapy building, director Dr. Andras Peto.  Budapest, Early Spring, 1960.

The street sign of the National Institute of Motor Therapy, Director Dr Andras Peto .   Early Spring, Budapest, 1960.

Dr András Petö (1893 – 1967) developed a theory and practice of physical rehabilitation of children with motor disorders such as cerebral palsy and brain injury.  His approach became known in Britain in the 1980s following two BBC TV documentaries: Standing Up for Joe (1986) and To Hungary with Love (1987). His work was the foundation of what is known as  conductive education, and  is now, in some countries, also applied to adults with Parkinson’s disease and after-stroke conditions.

It is not known whether Dr Seyfried was aware of Dr. Peto’s work before he visited Hungary, or whether Hungarian medical colleagues mentioned him to Dr.Seyfried once he had arrived in Hungary.  If Dr Seyfried met Dr Petö there are no surviving photos of them in this collection.

Buildings of the National Institute of Motor Therapy, Budapest.  Note the Communist Red Star.   Early Spring, 1960.  Norbert Kalvach has since written to say “A “Mozgásterápiai Intézet” később Pető Intézet első épülete a Villányi út 67 szám alatt volt. Ma felújítva újra központi épület lett.”  (“The Moving Therapy Institute became the first building of Peto Institute at Villanyi ut 67.   Today it has been restored to become a central building”.)  My thanks to Norbert for this information.

A partial view of the one storey building of the National Institute of Motor Therapy, Budapest, early Spring, 1960.

_______________________________

Budapest

Us Doc, Dr Seyfried, on the left, standing at the entrance of the Grand Hotel, with possibly a Hungarian colleague.  Probably Budapest, Summer 1959.  The location of the hotel is problematical as in 2018 there are two Grand Hotels in Budapest.  One is in the centre of Budapest and the second is on Margit Island, home to Palatinus Strand and Margit Island gardens.  (See 1959 photos below.)  What we are looking at in this photo is possibly the hotel on Margit Island, now known as the Danubius Grand Hotel Margitsziget.  The architectural features on the first floor are, in 2018, very similar to this photo from 1959, but the ground floor details and entrance has since changed.

The Fisherman’s Bastion – a nineteenth century fortress with seven turreted lookout towers. Budapest, summer 1959.

Dr Seyfried standing near ruins, with the Fisherman’s Bastion in the background. Budapest,1959.

Central Budapest, summer 1959.

Central Budapest, summer’s evening, 1959.

Budapest, summer 1959.

Central Budapest, early Spring, 1960.

The Great Synagogue, Budapest, also known as the Dohany Street synagogue.  It is the largest synagogue in Europe and the second largest in the world.  (The largest synagogue is in New York.)  Early Spring, 1960.

Budapest street, with Communist Red Flag and Hungarian flags either side, Spring 1960.

The above street photo with the Communist Red Flag, flanked by two Hungarian flags is interesting as the inclusion of the Communist Red Star and hammer and sickle emblem within the colours of the Hungarian flag was symbolically torn out by those protesting against and fighting against the Hungarian Communist Party and the Soviet crushing of the October 1956 Hungarian Uprising.  It is not clear whether as a post-Uprising concession the Hungarian Communist regime dropped the red star and hammer and sickle from the Hungarian flag.

Hungarian Communist flag with Red Star and Hammer and Sickle symbol.

Hungarian flag with the Communist Red Star and Hammer & Sickle symbol ripped out, mounted on a captured Soviet tank.  The heavy shelling of the building and displaced slates is due to Soviet tank fire.

Hungarian flags in Budapest street with ripped out Communist Red Star and Hammer & Sickle, October 1958.  Unknown photographer.

The Hungarian Uprising started with a student demonstration in Budapest on 23 October, 1956 and quickly spread to workers who set up Workers Councils ensuring that services such as electricity and the radio, etc kept running.  The Uprising, also known as the Revolution, spread throughout Hungary.  Dithering at first, the Russians launched an armed intervention predominantly using tanks which often fired indiscriminately.  By 10 November the Revolution had been crushed by the Russian Soviets.  Approximately 2,500 Hungarians and 700 Soviet troops died.

Jack Esten was in Budapest when this Russian colonel drew his revolver and endeavoured to deprive him of his camera.”  Caption and source: Photography Year Book 1958.  Photo Jack Esten.  Jack Esten worked for the British Daily Herald as a Second World War photographer and was active into the 1950s.

__________________________

Budapest – Palatinus Strand & Margit Island gardens

Palatinus Strand entrance, summer 1959.

Dr Seyfried looking at a black nude statue on the steps at the entrance of Palatinus Strand, Budapest, Summer, 1959.  In photos from the 1940s the nude was white and her right arm was stretched upwards.  This black nude was perhaps temporary whilst the white nude was being restored.  Note the board  for wheelchair use next to the statues in both photos.  The white nude with outstretched right arm was back in place in the 1960s, and is still – 2018 – in position.

Palatinus Strand, with white nude with out-stretched right arm, and Fiat derivative police car. The Palatinus Strand sign changed, too, from 1959, and remains – 2018 – as seen in the above photo.  Photo  Circa mid 1960s. Photographer Unknown.

Sunbathers in swimming costumes, near one of the swimming pools, Palatinus Strand, summer 1959.

Palatinus Strand is a very popular collection of open air swimming pools and spa on the Margit Island in the Danube.  First opened in 1919, with a simple beach, it was significantly developed in the late 1930s.  Water to the pools is supplied by thermal springs.   Adjacent to Palatinus Strand there are popular public gardens. If  Dr Seyfried or his American colleague took photos of the open air baths themselves, they have not survived in this collection.

1940 colour photo of Palatinus Strand baths.  Photographer/source Unknown.

People in swimming costumes at Palatinus Strand, summer 1959.

Flower beds, swimming costumed people, and glimpsed in the distance (and in photo below) one of the pools at Palatinus Strand.  Summer, 1959.

Palatinus Strand, summer 1959.

People sitting and standing under the shade of trees near Palatinus Strand.  Note the parked motorbikes and mopeds in the background.  In the foreground a display of  for-sale wrapped bon-bons.

Refreshment cafe by Palatinus Strand and the gardens on Margit Island.  Budapest, summer 1959.

Dr Seyfried takes a photo of his US colleague, believed to be the gardens on Margit Island, Budapest. Summer 1959.

Visitors to the gardens on Margit Island, Budapest. Summer 1959.

Dr. Seyfried by an ice-cream seller, believed to be the gardens on Margit Island, Budapest. Summer 1959.

Budapest buses, believed to be by the gardens on Margit Island. Summer 1959.

Dr Seyfried standing on Margit Island. On the other side of the Danube is Obuda (Arpad Fejedelem utja).  Summer 1959. (My thanks to Matyas Keller for identifying the location in this photograph.)

________________________________

Dr A Seyfried standing outside Szechenyihegy railway station. Near Budapest, early Spring 1960.

At Szechenyihegy the Hungarian Communist Regime in the late 1940s built a narrow gauge children’s railway which became very popular, and remains popular as an excursion destination in post Communist Hungary.

Detail of Dr Seyfried standing near Szechenyihegy railway station.  Early Spring, 1960.

__________________________

Budapest – View from a High Window

View from a high window/balcony, over-looking the Danube, central Budapest, early Spring 1960.

Here are a series, taken on different times of the day, and different days from the same viewpoint.  It is assumed this was a hotel that Dr Seyfried and his US medical colleague were staying at during their early Spring visit to Budapest and Hungary.

Tug and barges on the Danube, Budapest, early Spring 1960.

War/1945 liberation memorial by the Danube, Budapest early Spring 1960.

Six open topped lorries with either troops or police or civilians parked near the War/1945 liberation memorial by the Danube. Budapest early Spring, 1960.  Note the stone parapet of the hotel/building balcony foreground.

Close up of the assembled open top lorries with military, police or civilians. Early Spring, 1960.

______________________________

View of Budapest rooftops, early Spring, 1960.

Dr Seyfried standing on the steps of the Szent Istvan Bazilika, Szent Istvan Square, Budapest.  Summer 1959. (My grateful thanks to Matyas Keller for identifying the location of this photograph.)

Looking towards Budapest from elevated rural position. Early Spring 1960.

______________________________

Somewhere in Hungary

Overcast day, somewhere by the Danube, early Spring, 1960.

War/1945 Liberation plinth in town square, with two male cyclists and two buses. Possibly a town near Budapest. Early Spring 1960.

Inter war or just post war village housing, with electricity wires and lone cyclist. Unidentified location, Hungary. Early Spring, 1960.

Cobbled main street in a small rural town, Hungary. Note the antennae on the far building on the right. Possibly a barracks town, or ex-estate landowner town. Early Spring, 1960.

Dr Seyfried standing in the middle of rural road after a spell of rain, with buildings, including a church in the near distance. Horse manure on the road and a man and women in a field. Unidentified location, Hungary. Early Spring, 1960.

_______________________________

Articles and Papers written or co-written by Dr A Seyfried between 1999 – 1953.  Source Pubmed.

_________________________________

Coming next, late April 2018

Dawlish:  Is it a Bird, Is it a Plane?

A Happening.

Photos by Pete Grafton.

Dawlish, Summer 2016.

_________________________

Don’t Miss a Photo Post.

Click on the FOLLOW button, top right hand side.

________________________

 

Posted in Hungary, People, Vintage Photos | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 4 Comments

US Doc in Eastern Block 1958 – 1960. Part 2 Czechoslovakia

US Doc in Eastern Bloc 1958 – 1960

______________________________

photos from the petegrafton collection

Part 2:  Czechoslovakia Summer 1959.

The Background

US Doc, an orthopaedic specialist, in Prague, summer 1959. His name is believed to be Dr.A. Seyfried

We have, at the moment, no idea how it was that the American Doc, believed to be Dr A Seyfried, an orthopaedic specialist, was visiting Communist controlled countries in the Eastern Bloc. (My very grateful thanks to Liz Willis, former librarian with the Medical Research Council, London, for searching and locating in Pubmed papers written by a Dr A Seyfried. By their speciality – mostly in arthritic and rheumatoid conditions, and period of publication – 1953 – 1999,  and that these papers were mostly published in Polish specialist publications, and one published in a Czech  publication, we can be reasonably sure this is the one and same person. The full Pubmed list is at the foot of this Post.)

The Cold War was at its height – the Hungarian Uprising had been put down by Soviet tanks and military in October 1956 –  two and a half years before these photos were taken in the then Czechoslovakia.

It may be that Dr.Seyfried, and a colleague were working for, or attached to the World Health Organisation in Geneva.  In transparencies from Czechoslovakia a Mercedes with Swiss plates is shown.

The photos – Kodachrome transparencies – were mostly taken by a colleague – possibly also a visiting US doctor – of the “US Doc”.  They were bought on ebay in 2008.  The seller had additional sets of photos taken  – by the same source –  of visits to Poland and Hungary in 1958, 1959 and 1960.

Kodachrome transparency and mount, processed September 1958.

Only a  very few of the transparency mounts had an identifying name – place, or person. The majority didn’t.  The ebay seller batched the sales under country, and year.  The year can be identified by the Kodak lab  date stamp on the transparency mounts.

The transparencies shown here are selected first by the orthopaedic interest, and then by local photos, outings and so on.  They are a rare colour chronicle of aspects of everyday life, and civic life,  in countries that were to live under Communist/military control  in Eastern Europe for a further 32 years from when they were taken. And, of course, they show orthopaedic practices and care of children and adults at that time.

Please use the Leave a Reply facility to get in touch if you can identify towns, places, people, or anything you spot and can clarify.  It would be very much appreciated.

______________________________

Czechoslovakia

Orthopaedic Practice

Entrance to the Universita Karlova Klinika pro Orthoepedickov, Praha/Prague.  Us Doc – Dr A Seyfried centre – with Professor Miroslav Jaros, the Clinic Director, to his right. Summer 1959.  (My very grateful thanks to Vaclav Hajek, Public Relations Officer at the Charles University, Praha/Prague for identifying Professor Miroslav Jaros and for providing a link to information about him. Also to Karel Cerny, Head of the Institute for History of Medicine and Foreign Languages, First Faculty of Medicine, Charles University, for additional information)  For this information on Professor Jaros see Footnote (1).

A formal photo of Professor Miroslav Jaros.  photo source fnmotol.cz

Professor Miroslav Jaros, the Clinical Director of the Karlova University Orthopaedic Clinic to the left of the man in the white shirt. Prague. Summer 1959.

Same location. Right to left: The Us Doc, Dr. A Seyfried on the left, standing next to Professor Miroslav Jaros.  2nd on the right probably a US colleague of Dr Seyfried.  The gent in the brown jacket is possibly Czechoslovakian.  Prague, summer 1959.

Dr A Seyfried and un-identified gent in front of a wall of Government, government agency and cultural posters. Assumed to be Prague, summer 1959.

Orthopaedic clinic, believed to be in Prague. Lamp off.

Lamp on, for photography.

Orthopaedic clinic, Prague with Czechoslovakian orththopedic doctor, children and nurses.  Summer 1959.

Orthopaedic clinic, Prague, summer 1959.

Orthopaedic clinic Prague with nurse helping young child. Summer 1959.

Exercises for young children, orthopaedic clinic Prague, with male and female staff.  Summer 1959.

Young man using sticks, overseen by Czechoslovakian Orthopaedic specialist. Prague, summer 1959.

Believed to be a Czechoslovakian orthopaedic specialist, on roof of clinic building. Probably Prague skyline. Summer 1959.   Doubtful that it is evening – more likely wrongly exposed photo. (Transparency film has a low tolerance to incorrect exposure for lighting.  In the 1950s there were no auto exposure, auto focus cameras.  All settings had to be done manually.  Getting the correct light setting required a handheld light meter, or guess work.)

Their right to left: US Doc – Dr A Seyfried, with Czechoslovakian colleagues. The gent on the left is possibly a host from a Czechoslovakian Government tourist agency or a “Committee for Friendship & Cultural Relations with Foreign Countries”. The gentleman to his right is possible the same person on the roof in the photo above.

The Czech gent is now taking the photo and Dr A Seyfriend’s US colleague – who took the above photo –  is  now in the picture.

Dr A Seyfried playing skittles with Czechoslovakian colleagues. Believed to be Prague, summer 1959. As noted earlier, getting the wrong camera exposure for lighting – in this case only slightly – can cause a colour/darkness shift when using transparency film.

______________________________________

Prague/Praha

View of Prague, the River Vltava and on the horizon the Stalin Monument.  Summer 1959.

Dr Seyfried having his photo taken on the Charles Bridge, Prague with the Stalin Monument on the hill behind him.  Summer 1959.

Photo Crop of Dr Seyfried with the Stalin Monument on the hill behind him.  Prague, Summer 1959.

The Stalin Monument Prague, circa 1955.   photo Miroslav Vopata.

The Stalin Monument in Prague was the world’s largest Stalin Monument, completed in 1955.   Made of granite it took five years to build.  The day before it was unveiled the statue’s sculptor Otaker Švec took his life. The Stalin Monument survived another seven years. It was demolished – literally blown up – in 1962 on the orders of the Central Committee of the Czechoslovak Communist Party, with permission from Moscow. (2.)  Residents of Budapest took matters into their own hand and decapitated the head of their Stalin statue in October 1956, during the short-lived Hungarian Uprising – crushed by the invading tanks of the Soviet Union.

Budapest October 1956 and the head of Stalin, and Russian tank. Photographer Unknown.

The US doctor was visiting Czechoslovakia and the Eastern Bloc two and a half years after the crushing of the Hungarian Uprising.

The Swiss registered Mercedes car that Dr Seyfried and his US colleague used during their visit to Czechoslovakia. Near the centre of Prague.  Summer 1959.

The Powder Tower Prague,  seen from Celetna, Summer 1959.  It got its name as it was originally used to store gunpowder.

Unidentified tower, assumed to be Prague. Summer 1959.  The sign literally reads “Rapid shoe handling” – roughly Quick shoe repairs. U Prihodu does not appear on any Prague or Czech online maps, though there are one or two pensions with the name Prihodu in the Czech Republic.

Charles Bridge and Bridge Tower. It looks like Dr.Seyfried taking a photo. Prague, Summer 1959.  The gent in the snazzy grey suit is with him, possibly a Czechoslovakian colleague or host.

Dr Seyfried, with Czechoslovakian host (?) having their photo taken on Charles Bridge. The two gents passing them are from the Indian sub-continent. At this time the Soviet Union and their Eastern Bloc “colonies” encouraged visitors, students and exchange specialists from the non-aligned world. Later, from the 1960s onwards, this would also include countries that received military and economic help from the Soviet Union, such as Cuba and Angola.  Prague, summer 1959.

Dr Seyfried standing by the Edvard Capek Bazar in the Old Town Prague, summer 1959.  The Bazar was founded in 1911, selling hardware and bric-a-brac. Despite different regimes and governments: Hapsburg, inter-war democracy, Nazi, Communist, post-communist, it is still in business.  (The shop front has changed though.)  It was such a Prague feature that a Government Czechoslovakian film unit did a short piece on it in 1966. (2)

Short film from 1966 on the Eduard Capek bazar in the Old Town, Prague.  See footnote (2). Source SFU, on You Tube.

Dr Seyfried standing near an enclosed park with a modern Bird effigy and old church in background. Believed to be Prague, summer 1959.

Rooftops and spires, Old Town, Prague, summer 1959.

Looking over roof tops towards the Castle on the horizon, Prague, summer 1959.

High view looking over roof tops with the River Vltava, Prague, summer 1959.

The River Vltava and the Castle, Prague, summer 1959.

All Quiet on the Vltava.

The River Vltava.  Unknown location, possibly near Prague.

_____________________________

Days in the Countryside

The countryside is never far from Prague.

Dr.Seyfried near a camping area, assumed to be countryside near Prague. He seems to have acquired a flap cap, and a Czechoslovakian one, at that. Summer 1959.

Camping area with lake in the foreground. Assumed to be near Prague. Summer 1959.

Dr Seyfried by a village duckweed covered pond.  He is holding his cap and his shoes are highly polished, as usual.  Czechoslovakia, summer 1959.

Dr Seyfried with Czechoslovakian colleague or host. Village pond in background, and village bell.   Fairly new looking electricity poles.  Czechoslovakia, summer 1959. 

Main road to unidentified country town with an old towered building.  Czechoslovakia, summer 1959.

Dr Seyfried and week-end bags visiting, it is presumed, medical specialist Czechoslovakian colleagues in the countryside.

Many Prague residents long to have a weekend house/summer house in the surrounding countryside, and this is a tradition that goes back a long time.  It was the central story-line in Jiri Menzel’s Seclusion Near a Forest /Na samote u lesa (1976).

It looks like the gate is getting a coat of paint. The Mercedes that Dr. Seyfried and his US colleague are using is parked in the background.

Dr Seyfried in a meadow with a man with a hay rake. Both men wearing caps. A lovely summer’s scene in the Czechoslovakian countryside. Summer 1959.

Summer house in the countryside, duvets airing on the upstairs balcony, Dad doing a repair to the summer house, Mum podding peas or beans, two beach balls and three children and a pre-war cabriolet car parked in the shade of the pine trees. And a stack of hay on the right hand side. Idyllic scene, Czechoslovakia, summer 1959.

Seclusion Near a Forest (1976): Mum and Dad, and their two children in the back of the Skoda, setting off from their flat in Prague for the  nearby countryside.

_____________________________

Pilsner Urquell/Plzenský Prazdroj

Dr Seyfried standing by Rokycany town sign.  Czechoslovakia summer 1959.

Rokycany is south west of Prague, on the main road to Pilsen (Plzen).  There would seem no reason for Dr Seyfried to have his photo taken at the town’s roadside sign.  It has no connection with brewing.  However, a wild speculation could be that as a younger man – 14 years before, – he was in the US Army in May, 1945 when it liberated Rokycany from German forces.  Rokycany had a significance as it was on an agreed demarcation line  between the US forces and the Soviet forces to the east of the town.  An alternative  speculation is that a friend of his back in the US, knowing he was going to visit Pilzen asked him for a photo of post-war Rokycany.  The photo has been wrongly exposed – it is unlikely it is night-time.  Rokycany is only 42 miles from Prague and 14 miles from Pilsen.

Civilians & GIs and GIs dancing with Czech Women, main square Pilsen.  The US 2nd Infantry Division entered Pilsen on 7 May, 1945, relieving the 16th Armoured Division.   photo source militarycarclub.cz

US forces entered this part of Czechoslovakia from the west, crossing from the German border.  It may be that they, or another Division entered and liberated Rokycany on the same day.

Dr Seyfried standing outside the Pilsner Urquell brewery, summer 1959. We have seen the gent on his left in some of the Prague based photos. 

The Pilsner Urquell brewery, circa 2013.  Image acknowledgement Google Street View.

Dr. Seyfried watching workmen roll barrels in the Pilsner Urquell brewery, summer 1959.

Dr Seyfried points to the sign of the HQ of Plzenske Pivorary (Pilsner Urquell/Plzensky Prazdroj).  The smaller letters indicate it is a “National Company”   The brewery was State owned in 1959.  Part of the brewery can be seen on the left.

Dr Seyfried leans on the street board of the Prazdroj  Restaurant.

Dr Seyfried by the street board of the Prazdroj Restaurant, with Czechoslovakian colleague or host.

Inside the Prazdroj Restaurant, Pilsen/Plzen.   Summer 1959.

_______________________________

Although there was a demarcation line between US and Soviet Forces at Rokcany, the Yalta Agrrement gave the Soviet Union the right to oversee elections in Czechoslovakia, as well as Poland, Hungary, eastern Germany, Romania, and Bulgaria.  Systematically from 1945 the Russian Soviet Union destroyed the fledgling democracies using what the Hungarian Communist Leader Rákosi in a 1952 secret session called “Salami Tactics” – piece by piece, bit by bit.  The occupying Soviet military/ administration insisted on Coalitions/Popular Fronts whilst elections were arranged, whilst at the same time insisting that local communists (most of whom had spent their war in Moscow) be given the powerful Ministry of Interior posts.

Elections were fixed, or where there was a strong pre-war democracy, such as in Czechoslovakia, the democratic politicians were undermined, or accused of working for the U.S..  There were threats, show trials, imprisonment and in some cases executions. By 1950 all of these liberated countries had become colonies of the Soviet Union, run by the local Communists.  There had been a restlessness and demonstrations by the subject populations as early as 1953 in East Germany, 1955 in Poland and the Hungarian Uprising in 1956.

In 1968 – 9 years after these photos were taken in the summer of 1959 –  Czech Communist leader Alexander Dubcek tried to contain the demands from within the country for greater freedom by introducing some liberalisation. He resisted pressure from Moscow. The Russians were not having it.  In the largest military attack on a European country since the end of the Second World War, the Russian Soviet Union and their Warsaw Pact forces invaded Czechoslovakia in August. It was another 21 years before Czechs and Slovaks would regain the freedom they had had before 1939.

“Protester confronts Soviet tank, morning of 21 August 1968, Main Square, Bratislava, Slovakia.” photo Ladislav Bielik.

“Protesters throw stones at the Soviet tanks entering Prague.”    Photo source Czech Press Agency archive.

____________________________

Footnotes

1. Professor Miroslav Jaros, (1897 – 1970).  “Completed his medical studies in 1922 and worked as an operative at the Surgical and First Obstetrics clinic in Prague…  In 1927 he took a study trip to France, and in the same year he was assistant at the Prague Orthopedic Clinic…. In 1958 he was appointed head of the Orthopedic Clinic and in 1967 the chair of the Orthopedic Department of the 1st Medical Faculty of the Charles University…” – source http://www.zdrav.cz

In addition, Karel Cerny, Head of the Institute for History of Medicine and Foreign Languages, First Faculty of Medicine, Charles University, Praha/Prague has kindly added further information in an email to the author: “He was head of the Orthopedic Clinic between 1958-1970.  Jaros was a member of several Czech and foreign scientific societies and between 1968-1970 also a member of the scientific board of the faculty.  He is one of the founding personalities of modern Czech orthopedics“.

2. See Stalin Monument (Prague) from Wikipedia, and Radio Prague item, May 2016, both online.  In addition, there is a 2016 report that a feature length film is being made about the Monument sculptor Otaker Svec.

3. See the  short film  on You Tube: Vetesnictvi Eduard Capek (1966).

_________________________

Don’t Miss a Photo Post

Click on the FOLLOW button, top right hand side.

____________________________

The articles written, or co-written by Dr A Seyfried listed in Pubmed are reproduced below the “Coming Soon” section.
____________________________

Coming next, early April, 2018

US Doc in Eastern Bloc 1958 – 1960

Part 3:  Hungary, Summer 1959 & Spring 1960

___________________________

Listing for Dr A Seyfried 1999 – 1953, sourced from Pubmed

_______________________________

Posted in Czechoslovakia, People, Vintage Photos | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

US Orthopaedic Doc in Eastern Bloc 1958 – 1960. Part 1: Poland and Bulgaria

US Doc in Eastern Bloc 1958 – 1960

_________________________________

Photos from the petegrafton collection

Part 1: Poland & Bulgaria Summer 1958.

Zagorz, south-eastern Poland. US Doc, believed to be Dr A Seyfried, on the right.  Summer, 1958. 

Unidentified town, or city suburb street, perhaps Warsaw.   Poland. Summer 1958.

The Background

US Doc, an orthopaedic specialist, in Prague, summer 1959.  His name is believed to be Dr. A. Seyfried.

We have, at the moment, no idea how it was that the American Doc, believed to be Dr A Seyfried, an orthopaedic specialist, was visiting Communist controlled countries in the Eastern Bloc. (My very grateful thanks to Liz Willis, former librarian with the Medical Research Council, London, for searching and locating in Pubmed papers written by a Dr A Seyfried. By their speciality – mostly in arthritic and rheumatoid conditions, and period of publication – 1953 – 1999,  and that these papers were mostly published in Polish specialist publications, and one published in a Czech  publication, we can be reasonably sure this is the one and same person. The full Pubmed list is at the foot of this Post.)

The Cold War was at its height – the Hungarian Uprising had been put down by Soviet tanks and military in October 1956 –  less that 18 months before these photos were taken in Poland, and Poland itself had had significant demonstrations in Poznán in 1955 against the Stalinist Soviet/Communist regime, which shook the Communist hierarchy and brought temporary “liberalisation” which turned out to be temporary concessions by the Polish Communist leader Wladyslaw Gomulka.

It may be that Dr.Seyfried, and a colleague were working for, or attached to the World Health Organisation in Geneva.  In transparencies from Czechoslovakia a Mercedes with Swiss plates is shown.

The photos – Kodachrome transparencies – were mostly taken by a colleague – possibly also a visiting US doctor – of the “US Doc”.  They were bought on ebay in 2008.  The seller had additional sets of photos taken  – by the same source –  of visits to Czechoslovakia and Hungary in 1959 and 1960, which will be appearing during March, 2018 on petegraftonphotos.com

Kodachrome transparency and mount, processed September, 1958.

Only a  very few of the transparency mounts had an identifying name – place, or person. The majority didn’t.  The ebay seller batched the sales under country, and year.  The year can be identified by the Kodak lab  date stamp on the transparency mounts.

The transparencies shown here are selected first by the orthopaedic interest, and then by local photos, outings and so on.  They are a rare colour chronicle of aspects of everyday life, and civic life,  in countries that were to live under Communist/military control  in Eastern Europe for a further 32 years from when they were taken. And, of course, they show orthopaedic practices and care of children and adults at that time.

Please use the Leave a Reply facility to get in touch if you can identify towns, places, people, or anything you spot and can clarify.  It would be very much appreciated.

_______________________________

Poland

Orthopaedic  Practice

Childrens Hospital, Zagorz, south-eastern Poland. Possibly Dr Kowalski, Summer, 1958. The literal translation on the sign reads “Educational Institute for Children” and the town is identified as Zargorz, in south-eastern Poland.  It is suggested that the “Institute for Children” is a children’s home/hospital for general health issues.  My thanks to Darek Machaj for the translation of the sign.                                                                    

“Dr Seyfried, Kowalski’s Hospital”. If the note on the transparence storage box is the match for the transparency, Dr Seyfried would be the “US Doc”, on the right. It is assumed it is the Polish Doctor Dr Kowalski standing next to him.

Young boy in hospital cot, believed to be Zargorz.

Young children with orthopaedic problems outside on cot beds, believed to be Zagorz.

Nurse and young children with crutches, orthopaedic unit, believed to be Zagorz.

Young child with crutches, with nurse, orthopaedic unit, believed to be Zagorz.

“Spine tools”. Annotation on Index sheet of transparency storage box.

“Spine tools” (2). annotation on Index sheet of transparency storage box

Very young children in outside area, with parallel bar walking aid, orthopaedic clinic, believed to be Zagorz.

__________________________________

Meeting and Observing Polish People.

Primary class children out for a walk, believed to be Zargorz.  Possibly the River Oslawa down from the road.

Polish men (and boy) in traditional outfits. US Doc in grey suit on the right.  Unknown location.

Polish men, some in traditional outfits, with the US Doc and assumed to be Polish colleague, or host, in blue shirt.  Note church behind them. Unknown location.

Entry to church area. Unknown location.

Woman in green costume, going to church. Unknown location.

Young girl and women in traditional costume walking to church. Unknown location.

Women entering the church. Unknown location.

Country area. Woman waiting at a bus stop, men in traditional costume, a horse eating hay from a sack and railway sidings. Unknown location, but possibly near the above photos of men and women in traditional costume.

A visit to a house in the countryside. Note the chicken, the apple trees and the bare-chested man taking a break, with building work in the background. No I.D. for the formerly dressed woman, or for the location.

Note the ramp up to the chicken house and the short piece of plank to stop chickens wandering into the attached dwelling. Unknown location.

Best summer dresses on, and smart casual gent, for the American visitor/s.  Unknown location.

A lovely summer’s day in Poland, 1958 and a smiling group of country women and girls. The smart casual gent in the dark blue shirt is in the background looking at how the building work is going. Unknown location.

__________________________

Warsaw/Warszawa

Statue of Workers, with the US Doc, Dr Seyfried.   Believed to be Warsaw.

Statue of Workers, believed to be Warsaw. The gent in the western style suit is perhaps the US Doc’s US medical colleague, and if so, he is the one who is taking the bulk of the photos that we see in this collection of Eastern Bloc photos. 

Urban street scene, Poland summer 1958.  Possibly Warsaw.

“Warsaw Stadium”, written on Index sheet of transparency storage box.

_______________________________

Elsewhere in Poland, Summer 1958.  “Unknown locations”.

It is a 243 mile drive (391 Km)  from Warsaw to Zagórz and Zagórz is close to the border with the Ukraine, and with Slovakia (Czechoslovakia as it was, in 1958).  The following photos are assumed to be within Poland, for lack of any other identifying evidence.

Level crossing, edge of rural village. Horse and trap, children and student.  Poland 1958.

Rural town – building repairs. Note the old style wheel barrow with wooden wheel, just off centre. The barrow design goes back at least to the Middle Ages. Also a cable/hose (water?) lying on the dusty road. Poland 1958

The same road and hose pipe as in the previous photograph.  Dr. Seyfried having his photograph taken with a lady with a good suit, hat and handbag – a Polish medical specialist colleague?  To their side, cobblestones.  Poland 1958.

Formal municipal park assumed to be in a medium-sized town.  Note the pre-1939 studio plate camera on the tripod, foreground right.  Poland 1958.

The same park with US Doc and young summer frocked woman. Possibly a Polish Tourist Agency Host (if so she would possibly also be a Communist Party member, and, either way, she would be required to report back to the Polish secret police, the “SB” on the US Doc’s attitudes/views, when in her company).  The car parked in the background (which may be their form of official transport in this part of Poland) has been identified as probably a Polish made Warszawa M20, modelled on the Russian Gaz M20 Podeba.  My grateful thanks to Peter Frost for identifying this car, and others that follow in this Post.  Also my thanks to Mel Holley of the IFA Club and Ian Reid in facilitating the identification.

Dr Seyfried standing by a partially built Alpine type wooden house. Note the stooks of hay further up the slope.  Probably in the Carpathian Mountains area.  Poland 1958.

US Doc and others by a new Alpine style house and attached barn. Note the size of the over-hanging eaves, typical of such alpine buildings. It looks like a Warszawa M20 car. Probably in the Carpathian Mountains area. Poland 1958.

View of fortified town. Glimpse of river below. US Doc in centre of photo. Poland 1958.

Two Americans on the right, assumed to be with the US Doc. The car with the American styling has been identified by Peter Frost as a French made Simca Vedette Versailles. A viewer to this Post has identified the registration plate: “The car has a Bulgarian registration for Sofia”.  (Sofia, capital of Bulgaria.) Unknown location. Note the concrete steps, on the left, up to the grass, and kerb stones, indicating some kind of municipal/civic feature.  Despite the lushness of the greenery it is possible this is Bulgaria.  The car would suggest it is and the man being given a light is possibly their Bulgarian Tourist Agency/minor official attached to them for Bulgaria.  He appears in  photos below.  1958.

_____________________________

Bulgaria. 

Untarmacked highway in the countryside, with oxen pulled farm cart, husband and wife, and a calf. Bulgaria 1958.

“Committee for Friendship and Cultural Relations with Foreign Countries”and the American Doc, Dr Seyfried.   The unsmiling man with him has the look of a Communist Party functionary. Going by the body language and physical space between them, the “Friendship” is very guarded.  The location is outside the Committee HQ in Boulevard Ruski 5, Sofia, Bulgaria, Summer 1958. (See below on a released declassified CIA document on the function and distribution of Committees for Friendship and Cultural relations with Foreign Countries. It is from this document that we can identify the address of the above photo)

A Top Secret  1957 CIA report on the function and distribution of Committees for Friendship and Cultural Relations with Foreign Countries was declassified in 2000.  These Committees were fronts for information gathering on the military, economic, industrial and other expertise of foreign countries.  It may be that all of Dr. Seyfried’s visits to Poland, Czechoslovakia, Bulgaria and Hungary were set-up and facilitated by these committees.  We don’t know whether he and his US colleague/s, at this time, were attached to the World Health Organisation (WHO) in Geneva, or were senior staff of US Teaching Hospitals.  It is assumed that they and other visitors out-with the host country would be briefed (depending on their speciality) on keeping circumspect in some areas of  their expertise.  It is also probable that some foreign visitors would also be involved in intelligence gathering themselves, at the request of their own security services.

It seems that Dr.Seyfried and his US medical colleagues were given a fairly slack rein in their social contact with their host orthopedic colleagues and their families.  It is assumed a lot of medical specialities were benign, including orthopedics.  Some, such as microbiology, with it’s possible uses in germ warfare, would not have been.

Oxen drawn cart in the countryside, with wife and husband. Unknown location, believed to be Bulgara. Summer 1958.

US Doc listening to elderly head-scarfed Bulgarian woman holding a loaf of bread.  The young man to the right, with the see-through shirt and pack of cigarettes in the breast pocket is possibly an attached host from the Tourist Agency, or Committee for Cultural Relations.  He appears in a further photo.  Lovech, Bulgaria. 1958.  (1)

Elderly woman on a donkey in a covered, shop-lined bridge. US Doc to his left looking at a brochure. The skylights are open at top. A warm summer’s day.  Lovech, Bulgaria. 1958.

American Doc, second American and Bulgarian host, seen in two earlier photos.  The acronym, on the building (church?), in the Bulgarian cyrillic alphabet has yet to be understood.  Bulgaria, summer 1958.  (This building is now known to be a 17th century baths in Lovech.   See note below)

“The two pictures of the covered bridge from Bulgaria are definitely from Lovech. They are particularly interesting as the bridge was reconstructed in the early 80s and does not look like this any more.

The unidentified building (church?) is actually an old public baths (“БАНЯ” in Bulgarian) again in Lovech. The building is from Ottoman Empire times (17th century) and still exists today. It is currently a museum.”

Pete Grafton writes: I am very grateful to Zzazzo for identifying (04.06.2018) the town with  the covered bridge and what I thought was possibly a church.  Thanks very much, Zzazzo, for this information.  It is very much appreciated.

____________________________

Women with a child, and behind them a bare-footed woman, possibly Roma. Bus further down the street with man hauling up luggage to the roof. Newly planted pavement trees.The drab military green lorry is not necessarily an army lorry. Unidentified rural town. Bulgaria, summer 1958.

_________________________________

Footnote

(1)  At Lovech a Concentration Camp was built by the Bulgarian Communist government  and opened in 1959 the following year from when these photos were taken.  It is estimated that approxiamately 150 people perished in the camp.  The camp was closed in 1962.  There will be a Post about the Lovech camp in the autumn of 2018 at petegrafton.com.

_________________________________

The articles written by Dr A Seyfried and listed in Pubmed are reproduced below the “Coming Soon” section.

________________________

Coming soon, mid March 2018

US Doc in Eastern Bloc

Part 2: Czechoslovakia, Summer 1959

Entrance to the Universita Karlova Klinika Pro Orthopedickov, Prague/Praha. US Doc centre, with possibly the clinic director on his left. Summer 1959.

The Swiss registered Mercedes used by the US Doc in Czechoslovakia. Believed to be near the centre of Prague. 1959.

Orthopaedic clinic, Prague.   Summer 1959.

A countryside visit to the family/friends of a Czech orthopedic colleague. Summer 1959.

___________________________

Don’t Miss a Photo Post

Click on the FOLLOW button, top right hand side.

___________________________

Listing for Dr A Seyfried, 1999 – 1953, sourced from Pubmed.

____________________________________________

Posted in Bulgaria, People, Poland, Vintage Photos | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 5 Comments

Gone Glasgow/Cool Glasgow

Gone Glasgow/Cool Glasgow

All Photos:  Pete Grafton

Gone Glasgow    Odeon, Renfield Street.

Cool Glasgow   Sauchiehall Street

____________________

Gone  Glasgow

The original Kings Cafe, 2002.

C&A, Sauchiehall Street, 1999.

Glasgow Apollo demolition, 1989.

Grass on George Square, July 1999. Now tarmacked over, for “Events”.  No grass now to picnic on, have your lunch or chill out.

Daggs “The Gardeners Shop”, Bath Street, 2004.  After 92 years in business it closed in June 2005.

Daggs “The Gardeners Shop”, 2004.  Always a friendly, knowledgeable staff who knew their Epicure potato from an Arran Pilot.

The best baccy, fag and cigar shop in Glasgow – Herbert Love’s in St Vincent Place, just off George Square. Closed December, 2007.

The Rubaiyat, Byres Road. Closed.

Odeon, Renfield Street, December 2003. Note Evening Times seller

Odeon, Renfield Street, closed, 2007.   Still an Evening Times Pitch.

Closed Odeon, and one of those afternoons.  2007.  Still an Evening Times vendor.

Franco’s, Central Station. 1997.

Franco’s, Central Station, January, 2004.

Franco’s, Central Station, and some of the wonderful staff, summer 2002. And no, unfortunately I never did get ’round to photographing the man himself – Franco.

______________________

Cool  Glasgow

Supercuts, and super style, Central Station, Glasgow, opposite from Franco’s.  June 1999.

Supercuts too. The sharp end of cool. Glasgow Central Station, June 2002.

No one needs a catwalk when you’ve got Central Station. Glasgow, August, 2003.

How to wear a blazor, and style your hair. Glasgow Central Station, August, 2003.

 Glasgow, July, 1999.

Young couple, Argyle Street, June, 1999.

Richard Burton look-a-like motorcycle cop, Argyle Street. 1999. Dillons bookshop and Strathclyde Police both gone.

Eco demo woman, St Enoch Square, June, 1999.

Into town, meet a few pals. Central Station, March 2003.

Dog and his man. Central Station, March 2003.

Glory Box.   Buchanon Street end of Sauchiehall Street, June 2003.

Uefa Cup final, Glasgow. 2007.  Programme seller.

‘That’s brilliant.’   Photo booth, Glasgow Central station, August 2003.

Cool dude. Glasgow Central, August, 2003.

Central Station, Glasgow,  August, 2013.   Brilliant hair styling, great suit.

_______________________

Pete Grafton Photo Posts coming in  March & April 2018

U.S. Doc in Eastern Bloc, 1950s.

Photos from the Pete Grafton Collection

US Doc, on left, believed to be an orthpedic surgeon, in front of Communist Party street posters.  Prague, July 1959

Little girl and specialist nurse, orthopedic clinic, believed to be Prague. July 1959.  Photo taken by U.S. Doc.

____________________________

Dawlish: Is it a Bird, Is it a Plane?

A Happening.

Photos by Pete Grafton.

Dawlish.  Summer, 2016.

________________________

Don’t Miss a Photo Post

Click on the FOLLOW button, top right hand side.

__________________________

Posted in People, Scotland | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment